The Haringvliet energy park consists of a 38MW solar facility a 22MW wind power complex and 12 battery containers. The three systems share the same grid connection.

From pv magazine Germany

Sweden-based energy company Vattenfall commissioned its first hybrid, utility scale wind-photovoltaic-storage project in the Dutch province of South Holland on Tuesday.

The energy park Haringvliet benefits from synergy effects which lead to lower development costs and reduces the impact on the environment, according to Vattenfall, which sees its first so-called full hybrid power plant as a blueprint for many other projects.

The power plant consists of a 38MW photovoltaic power plant and a 22MW wind farm connected to 288 batteries in 12 standard containers. The three systems share the same grid connection.

“We are gaining important experience with the project which we also want to use here in Germany,” explained Claus Wattendrup, head of the solar and batteries business unit at Vattenfall. “The combination of generation and storage can serve as an example for more efficient planning and implementation of such projects. This can also accelerate the expansion of renewable energy in Germany.”

The generation plants complement each other, with the photovoltaic system supplying plenty of electricity during the day, and from spring to autumn, while the wind turbines produce a particularly large amount in the winter months. At the same time, the battery storage ensures that the grid remains stable and serves as a temporary storage facility for the electricity generated. According to Vattenfall, specially developed software ensures that the various components work together optimally.

The company also emphasizes the advantages of the integrated planning and development of such full hybrid power plants. In Germany, the period between planning and the first generation of electricity for wind farms is seven years, on average. But if the photovoltaic system and battery storage are included from the start there would be important time savings in planning. In addition, the joint realization is more cost-effective than if each technology is deployed individually, as they share the same substation, the same cables and service routes.