Japanese automaker Toyota has used its hydrogen tank tech in a new module to expand hydrogen storage to railways, shipping facilities, cargo ports, and fuel cell generators. Its 70MPa tank has a storage capacity of 2.7 kg to 18.7 kg and a tank mass ranging from 43.0 kg to 243.8 kg, depending on the size.

Japanese automaker Toyota Motor has developed a hydrogen storage module that uses its resin high-pressure hydrogen tank technology for fuel cell vehicles.

The company said the storage module will enable the use of the tank to store hydrogen in applications other than automobiles.

The 70 megapascals (MPa) resin high-pressure hydrogen tank developed for automobiles is now the subject of numerous requests from those who would like to use it in railways, shipping, and port cargo handling, as well as fuel cell generators,” it said. “Toyota developed this hydrogen storage module as a way to answer these demands and expand the use of hydrogen.”

It also added that the resin high-pressure hydrogen was already tested in its Mirai fuel cell vehicle and safety devices such as hydrogen detectors and automatic shut-off switches. Depending on the size, these tanks have a storage capacity of 2.7 kg to 18.7 kg and a tank mass ranging from 43.0 kg to 243.8 kg

The module unit, according to the manufacturer, embeds safety-assured tanks and is equipped with several safety devices that automatically monitor the module operation status.

“As storing and transporting hydrogen more safely and efficiently can be done through high-capacity hydrogen loads, it is possible to use hydrogen-based energy in a range of locations where hydrogen filling is difficult, such as ports or mountain areas,” it explained. “Toyota will be working on connecting with new business partners and carrying out verification testing with the idea of expanding hydrogen use even further.”

Toyota demonstrated its first hydrogen tank for automobiles in 2001 and is one of the most active carmakers now developing technologies for fuel cell vehicles. It has produced the vehicle-mounted 70 MPa tanks since 2008, and more than 20,000 were produced for the first generation of Mirai vehicles.